disciplining your beagle
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  1. #1
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    disciplining your beagle

    I just bought a Beagle about 3 days ago.... He's 3 months old. First couple of days very calm... today, well WOW!! He's biting all of our cords that are plugged into walls and is starting to bite me when I'm putting his leash on. What I've started doing since yesterday is grabbing him by his nose.... as if to keep his mouth shut... Making sure that I have his atttention .. and then tell him NO... He whimpers a little as I do it ... so I know he doesn't like it. I'm doing this AS soon as I catch him in the act... biting/chewing things or me.
    My question is ... Is this wrong? Should I not be grabbing him by the nose or should I just be telling him no? Any suggestions would be very helpful. Thank you

  2. #2
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    You should never physically punish a dog -- ever -- with your hand or any part of the body. You have to do with vocal intonation and you have to catch them in the act or it means nothing. Be consistent. Try something loud like the old coins in a soda can thing to be the 'no'. But do not hit or hurt your dog as punishment.



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  3. #3
    I certainly agree that you should never strike a dog, cause them pain or harm them in any way in an ill-conceived attempt to discipline them.

    That said, despite how human-like dogs sometimes seem, they descended from wolves, Canis lupus, and are actually classified as a wolf sub-species, Canis lupus familiaris. The reason that I mention this is because it helps to understand how dogs think and how that thinking differs from our own.

    Wolf packs are organized into highly structured hierarchies, where each wolf knows its place within the pack. To a dog, the family that it belongs to (whether humans, other dogs or a combination) is its pack, and it will try to find its place. Each dog's personality is different, but it's entirely natural for a dog to challenge authority as part of how it determines its place in the pack.

    It's very important not to let any challenge by the dog succeed. A dog will interpret successful challenges as an increase in its pack status. The interesting thing is that a dog will feel just fine at any rung on the pack ladder as long as there is no ambiguity associated with its position there. Ambiguity in the pack hierarchy causes anxiety in dogs, and this can lead them to challenge authority in an effort to firm up the pecking order.

    I was once in an obedience class with a 4-month-old pup. An older lady was also in the class with a bishon frise. It soon became very clear that this poor lady held no sway over her dog at all. The dog would routinely ignore everything she said, and those things usually consisted of asking and pleading with the dog to obey, which it never did.

    After about an hour of this, the professional dog trainer who was running the class, asked the lady if it was alright if he showed her what should be done. He took the leash, and began trying to work with the dog. The dog, of course, assumed it was in charge and disobeyed him.

    The trainer immediately dropped to his knees, grabbed the dog, flipped it over on its back, bared his teeth, put his face about three inches from the dog's face and, in no uncertain terms, held it there for about 30 seconds while he yelled at it in a low, very firm voice. The dog resisted for awhile, then pee started dribbling out onto the floor.

    As soon as the trainer saw this display of submission, he immediately let loose of the dog and, like magic, the dog lost most of its previous attitude and began obeying the trainer. When the dog obeyed, he lavished it with enormous praise, but when it disobeyed, he immediately responded by reminding the dog that he was dominant. I doubt that the older lady ever managed to establish dominance over her dog, but it was a good education to the rest of the class in dog-think.

    It's extremely important to always be good to your dog, be friends with it and love it. It's equally important that this occur within a framework that the dog understands and respects. You absolutely don't want ambiguity over who is alpha. If the dog understand that its role is further down the hierarchal ladder, it will usually be just fine with that role — as long as it feels secure, needed and appreciated in its place in the pack hierarchy.

    Every dog needs to learn that good things immediately happen when it obeys alpha and that immediate and unhappy things happen when it disobeys. As for pups, they're just learning this stuff, and they're still exploring their way through it all. That being the case, you need to make special allowances for pup (child) behavior, but it's important that you always win each and every disagreement that you have with your pup.

    If there's any question over whether or not you'll win, don't fight the fight — you can't afford to lose. For example, if you're teaching your dog to come. Never, ever let it not come when you call it. When it comes on its own, praise it effusively, but if it doesn't come, you absolutely must immediately track it down and bring it back. The dog must understand in no uncertain terms, that one way or another, when you call, it WILL find itself coming back and that good things will happen when it comes back on its own.

    Like I said, ambiguity in the hierarchy will make an anxious dog, and that ambiguity will invite challenges to your authority. The dog will be happy as long as it's knows its place in the pack hierarchy is secure, important and appreciated by you, the alpha. And just to be clear, never hit your dog — you don't want a fearful dog. Instead, you want a dog that loves and respects you as the leader. And it has every right to expect that you will love and respect it as the follower.

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  5. #4
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    I don't know that I agree with those tactics. I wouldn't want that done to my dog anymore than I would for my child. I do know that the face offs have to go to the human.



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  6. #5
    I wouldn't suggest it for anything other than a way of establishing some ground rules for a serious dog disciplinary problem.

    A couple of months ago, I was walking our beagle in the neighborhood when I came across a couple walking two larger dogs. We stopped to talk while the dogs did their usually dog greetings. All of a sudden, the larger of the two dogs growled and bit our beagle, Mable, right on the back. Then the other dog jumped into the fight. There was all kinds of barking and yelping and commotion going on. We finally got the dogs separated, and the other couple was seriously embarrassed over their dogs' aggressive behavior. Mable didn't seem to be any worse for the encounter, so we all parted company.

    Twenty steps in the other direction, Mable stopped, looked back, turned, then did her dog shaking thing like dogs do. Then she immediately resumed sniffing everything in sight, her tail was in the air and her nose to the ground — she was as happy as could be, just as if absolutely nothing at all had happened.

    Sometimes dogs seem so human that we forget that they're really not like us. They have their own rules, their own behaviors, their own expectations and their own conclusions that they draw from their experiences. When working with dogs, I've found it very useful to try to think like them and do things in ways that they understand.

  7. #6
    Moderator BadgersMom's Avatar
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    I went through the same thing when I first brought Badger home after a week he was nipping, chewing things, and displaying bad behavior. I got frustrated and the more frustrated I got the worse he got because he knew I was just going to give up. I eventually broke down and spent the money on some one on one training with a trainer. Since then Badger has made great improvements. I have learned that it really is all in your body language. I am a big reader as well and have read some really great books on dogs and beagles as well which have helped me.

  8. #7
    Junior Member LucyQ8's Avatar
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    http://http://www.canismajor.com/dog/ttrain.html

    I found Web site helpful because my dog Lucy going through the biting stage.

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    I have to agree with Orrymain.
    And don't forget the dog is only 3 months old.
    You never punish the dog, you have to train him. The coins in the can work like magic. Anyways the biting will stop after teething.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aarooogh! View Post
    The trainer immediately dropped to his knees, grabbed the dog, flipped it over on its back, bared his teeth, put his face about three inches from the dog's face and, in no uncertain terms, held it there for about 30 seconds while he yelled at it in a low, very firm voice. The dog resisted for awhile, then pee started dribbling out onto the floor.
    You said you don't want a fearful dog but that is exactly what that method achieved. A dog urinating in submission is TERRIFIED.

    I would be furious if anyone handled my dog in such a manner, I am an obedience instructor and I would never ever condone anyone handling their dogs in such a manner in my class.

    Anyone who did would be taken aside and given a talking to about what is and isn't acceptable when it comes to how we handle our dogs. If I was student in a class and saw an instructor treat a dog in the manner you outlined above I would never ever go back to that class. Disgusting.

    There are lots of ways that we can train a dog to respect us, my beagle is a real challenge but I've never needed to alpha roll her to teach her to respect me.

  11. #10
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    As always Orrymain is right

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