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How To Teach Your Dog To Eliminate On Command

by Adam G. Katz


          Teaching your dog to defecate or urinate on command is actually just a process of creating an association.

          The command I use is, "Get Busy." But you can use any word or phrase that you please.

          You're probably wondering why anyone would want to teach their dog an elimination command. And probably the best answer to this question is that it enables you to establish both a time and a place for your dog to eliminate.

          For example, if you decide to go to bed early, and you don't want your dog to be uncomfortable for the next 7 or 8 hours, you can very easily take him outside and tell him to "do it now," because, "You won't have a chance to do it later since I'm going to bed."

          Having an elimination command also allows you to tell your dog WHERE he should urinate or defecate. For example, if you're taking your pup for a stroll and he indicates that he needs to eliminate... you don't want him to merely stop and do his business in the middle of the sidewalk. What an elimination command allows you to do is to walk the dog over to some bushes, or behind a building and tell him, "Here! Here is where you can 'get busy.'"

How to teach the "Get Busy" command

          Just like with any other command, your goal is to associate the phrase, "Get busy," with the action of either defecating or urinating.

          Here's what you need to do in 5 easy steps:

          1.) Take note of the usual times your dog needs to defecate or urinate.

          2.) Take him to the usual spot where he likes to eliminate and walk him back and forth, repeating the phrase, "Get busy, get busy, get busy."

          3.) When he begins to eliminate, continue saying, "Get busy." After five or six different occasions, your command will start to link with the behavior.

          4.) A half second after he finishes, praise him.

          5.) Repeat this process every time your dog needs to eliminate, and you'll soon find that he will begin to understand and at least make an attempt to evacuate the contents of his bladder on command.

Should you have a concern regarding the health of your Beagle(s), you should contact your veterinarian. All information on this site is presented solely for educational and informational purposes and should not, at any time, be considered a substitute for seeking or receiving veterinary care for your Beagle(s).