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I am really quite interested with behaviors of beagles particularly those that have been rescued from laboratories. This question popped up in my mind when I read the thread on rescued puppies.

Perhaps those who are proud owners of rescued beagles can compare notes here.
 

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Rescue animals are usually evaluated through a long process to make sure they can do well in a new home. I think it depends on the animal and their temperament. I have seen some rescue pets that have been through terrible things do just fine in their new home, others not so well.
 

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Not everyone is carved out to take care of these "scarred" creatures. It will take time, endless patience, and tons of effort to earn their trust in man again.
 

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Our dog was a stray and we guessed from an abusive home. He would not let us brush him and cowered at just about everything. Even petting him took some time. He has turned out to be the best dog ever, still doing well at 16!
 

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I remember a friend told me about a rescued beagle who cowers and pees whenever somebody comes near it for the first few days after it was rescued. it somehow lost its trust in man....=(
 

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i wish i could take one of those dogs. it breaks my heart that a dog has no idea what its like to run around and be a real dog. i live out in the country and they would have so much space they wouldnt know what to do with themselves. i hope they recover from their horrible pasts.
 

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rescued dogs, in general, often have a hard time trusting people. Time is said to heal all wounds...yes time and patience coupled with heaps of praise and encouragement...
 

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I know of one poor dog rescued from a laboratory that had to transfer from one prospective owner to another because the poor dog had developed every bone of animosity from its days spent at the laboratory. No one can come near him for fear of being bitten. The last time I heard, he's back at the shelter. :( :(
 

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i had a big lab that was the same way. it was a lot more dangerous to have him because he was half wolf and my dad took him from an old lady who had been feeding him for weeks out at her farm but she couldnt keep him around. he was so afraid of people that my dad had to catch him in a trap. my dad spent months with that dog, socializing him with other animals and himself for hours everyday. he worked 12 hour days at his job back then too so it was a labor of love. after having love forced on him whether he wanted it or not from my dad made that dog form an amazing bond with my dad. it got to the point were my dad could reach down and take food out of that dog's mouth (and he is WOLF too). what really amazed me was one day my cousin went missing and we found that little girl in the middle of the forest behind our house, and that big wolf/lab was wrapped around her and he had bite marks all over his body but that baby was untouched, but only a little scared of the "bad doggies" that were being mean to her. that dog was an amazing animal after he felt the strong love that all owners have for their dogs.
 

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Hi there. I recently began fostering a beagle who is 6 years old and was bred and raised specifically for lab research. Up until 2 weeks ago, she had never been outside the hospital, never stepped on grass, never gone up stairs - everything was a first for her. She has a really sweet disposition and she is really playful - loves other dogs and loves people, although she can be a tiny bit shy at first. She is gradually coming out of her shell. She can now go up stairs, but not down if they are steep. I take her for hikes and it's awesome to see her run full speed in the woods. Her one "problem" is that she is aggressive about her food ONLY toward other dogs. She doesn't care when I take her food or treats, but if another dog gets close, she will get aggressive. So, I'm working on that, as well as getting her used to everyday life in the real world. She's adjusting great so far and she'd make an awesome family pet - especially if she were the only dog (until her food issues can be sorted out). Anyways, it takes a lot of patience, but I'm sure lab beagles can adjust to life outside the lab and make great pets! She is amazing and I wish I could keep her, but I have another dog :-/
If anyone is interested in adopting her or knows someone who might be, definitely let me know :D Her name is Crash bc she used to crash into everything when she was little...aww lol :)
Beth
 

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My female was rescued from an abusive environment at 2 years of age 2 years ago. She was so happy to be welcomed into a home and has turned out to be one of the most loving dogs I have ever seen.
 

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I have three rescued Beagles. The first was 10 weeks from a pet shop/puppy mill. He was easy as he was so young, though I walked into the shop where the original owner bought him and he cowered and wouldn't even take a treat from them. The next came from our local animal control and was clearly abused. She wouldn't go near my husband for a month, and ducked when he tried to pet her. She wasn't housebroken at 3 yrs., and didn't know toys, bones, or how to play. We were patient and kind, spoke in high soft tones. She is now my husband's shadow, just adores him. Plays with the other two males and lords it over them a bit. She is currently sitting on a window seat waiting for my husband to come home from his volunteer job. The third dog came from a Beagle rescue group as a foster. He was a foster failure. He lived with a family and though they said he was hyperactive, he is not. Just a great, loving little guy. All three dogs are therapy dogs at the local VA. You can imagine when we walk in with a pack of 3. The vets love them and several say they are their favorite visitors. Patience and kindness are the key to rescue dogs, and remember most all dogs live in the now. Something to be learned from them.
 

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Our Dixie is a rescue beagle though she did not come from a laboratory she was dumped in the middle of the hot desert and found woundering on the side of the road. She was covered in ticks and sores. After we adopted we took her in for all her shots and a check-up, she was given a clean bill of health. But when we first brought Dixie home she was afraid of anything and everything and getting her to eat was a nightmare. She refused to eat crunchy dogfood or canned, we keep trying and she finally eat some canned beef dogfood and after sometime she started eating some crunchy bite size pieces of dry. It took lots of love and patience with her to get her to eat.
We have now had her for 8 months and she is just really beginning to come out of her shell she was in. In the beginning she was very shy and timid. Any sudden noises or moves towards her would scare her to death. We had to be patient with her but once she realized she wasn't going to be hit or worse she came around. Now she loves to go on rides and walks in the park. We have even found her in our closet on her daddies clean clothes. Last week the boys found her on the table looking for food. So I would say she has finally become comfortable enough with us to know she isn't going to get hurt any more.
I think rescue beagles just need time, patience and lots of love. Once they know they are safe and no harm will come to them they come around fairly quickly.
 

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Not everyone is carved out to take care of these "scarred" creatures. It will take time, endless patience, and tons of effort to earn their trust in man again.
I totally agree with this, Peggy was a lab rescue and had 4 homes before we took her on permanantly, people just couldn't put up with the constant following, naughty behaviour, baying, food stealing.

We knew it was going to be a long process with her and she's come on leaps and bounds but she still suffers terrible seperation anxiety and I haven't been able to return to work yet because of the noise and the neighbours but it's something we're still working on with her.
 

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Not everyone is carved out to take care of these "scarred" creatures. It will take time, endless patience, and tons of effort to earn their trust in man again.
It is so true, the first few weeks with our Dixie she was afraid of everything and getting her to eat anything was a nightmare she was so afraid of something bad happening to her but it has been 9 months later with our sweet little girl and she has let out all her beagle traits now, our only big problem with her now is her seperation anxiety issue, we can't leave her alone by herself because she just bays and howls like crazy, we hope that one day she will get past this in the meantime we have to make sure someone is with her all the time.
But she is the best and sweetest dog ever and if I had to do it all over again yes I would.
 

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Both of my beagles are rescues and I think both were abused and not socialized. I also had two rescue Greyhounds, one of which was terribly neglected and abused before the rescue group saved him. They have amazing hearts and an amazing ability to forgive what humans from their past had done to them. Of course they have issues - house breaking, not able to be crated, fear of some humans etc. For my husband and me the challenges we have gone thru with these dogs is worth it to have them in our lives. :)
 
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